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Over the moon in Tauranga

The Moon rising over Mauao. Time lapse/Photos: Dave Greig.

Click the image above to watch the video

The stunning site of the full moon rising over Mauao has been caught on camera by Tauranga Astronomical Society president Dave Greig.

The clear nights this week following the few days of rain have left the skies free of cloud cover, making it possible for Dave to capture the impressive images.

The Moon, rising over Mauao, photographed from Matua. Photo: Dave Greig.

Dave took the photos on Sunday night from Fergusson Park in Matua using his Nikon P900 and P1000 cameras.

“You can use MoonCalc to check the direction of the Moon from any location,” says Dave.

The MoonCalc site shows the direction of the Moon from any location. Image: MoonCalc.

Last week the Otumoetai Sports & Recreation Club building, which houses Tauranga Astronomical Society's observatory, had a much needed spruce up.

“It was a great team effort with volunteers from Otumoetai Football Club, Matua Scouts, Albion Cricket, Tauranga Astronomy, Otumoetai Lions and others from our awesome community,” says Dave.

Volunteers from Otumoetai Football Club, Matua Scouts, Albion Cricket, Tauranga Astronomy, Otumoetai Lions with painters from Dulux painting the Otumoetai Sports & Recreation Club building. Photo: Dave Greig.

“Dulux New Zealand kindly donated all the paints and materials to get it done and they also donated four painters to help us out for the day!”

During Covid Alert Level 2, the Tauranga Astronomical Society had to stop holding meetings at the Tauranga Observatory. Usually the society’s meetings are held on the second and fourth Tuesday of each month with presentations given on current astronomical topics and telescope viewing when weather permits.

The Tauranga Observatory is located at the Otumoetai Sports & Recreation Club building. Photo: John Borren.

Tauranga Astronomical Society often highlights through their website and Facebook page current astronomical events occurring around the globe, for example a report on the James Webb Space Telescope which is due to launch on December 22. Scientists hope that it will be able to see the universe’s first stars and galaxies.

"There is also a comet -  Leonard C/2021 A1 - currently in our western sky which we are keeping an eye on," says Dave.

"It is currently only visible through binoculars and telescopes but as it gets closer to the Sun, hopefully it might brighten enough to be seen with the naked eye."

Dave says it is due to be closest to the Sun on January 3.

"Although it is getting closer to the Sun, it is also getting further away from the Earth. I saw the comet last night through one of our smaller scopes. It looked like a small fuzzy patch."

The next public meeting for the astronomical society is scheduled for Tuesday February 22 2022 at 7.30pm, subject to circumstances at the time.

Anyone interested in joining the Tauranga Astronomical Society can contact Dave on email tas.secretary@gmail.com or www.tas.org.nz 

The Moon, rising over Mauao, photographed from Matua. Photo: Dave Greig.

 

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