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Snow warning for Desert Road

Snow is expected on the Desert Road tomorrow. Photo: Bay of Plenty and Taupo Police Facebook/File.

Rain, snow and possible thunderstorms are all on the cards for the North Island in the next couple of days.

The MetService has issued a snowfall warning is in place for the Desert Road and a severe weather watch is in force for the Bay of Plenty.

“The snow level is expected to lower to 1000 metres late Wednesday morning. One1 to 2cm of snow could accumulate near the summit until Wednesday evening,” says a statement from the weather organisation.

Meanwhile, periods of heavy rain and possible thunderstorms are being forecast for the Bay of Plenty.

“A series of active fronts and troughs embedded in disturbed westerlies continue to affect New Zealand until Wednesday.

“These fronts are expected to bring further periods of heavy rain and gale force winds to several regions of New Zealand, including the Chatham Islands.

“People are advised to stay up to date with the latest forecasts in case any changes are made or further areas are added.”

HEAVY RAIN WATCH

Area: Ranges of Bay of Plenty east of Whakatane

Valid: 11 hours from 3pm Tuesday to 2am Wednesday

Forecast: Periods of heavy rain with possible thunderstorms. Rainfall accumulations may approach warning criteria.

Area: Taranaki about and north of the Mountain, also Taumarunui and Taihape including Tongariro National Park

Valid: 10 hours from 9am to 7pm Tuesday

Forecast: Periods of heavy rain with possible thunderstorms. Rainfall accumulations may approach warning criteria.

Area: Westland north of Otira

Valid: 17 hours from 9am Tuesday to 2am Wednesday

Forecast: Periods of heavy rain with possible thunderstorms. Rainfall accumulations may approach warning criteria, especially about the ranges.

 

 

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snow

Posted on 17-08-2021 10:46 | By dumbkof2

anybody going south. desert rd snow warning so road will be closed regardless of how much snow actually falls