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Join the one in a million reo Māori moment

Māori Development Minister Nanaia Mahuta.

New Zealanders across the country are set to mark history as part of the Māori Language Week commemorations led by Te Taura Whiri i te reo Māori this year.

Māori Development Minister Nanaia Mahuta says the initiative will mark history for all the right reasons including making te reo Māori more accessible for all New Zealanders.

“With large gatherings like language parades suspended due to COVID-19, having an alternative virtual celebration of te reo Māori is an exciting new way to be involved and mark the occasion.

“Regardless of where you are on the learning spectrum, this is one of the many initiatives that every New Zealander can participate in using the language and being more confident and comfortable with te reo Māori in your own environment.”

Te Wā Tuku Reo Māori, the Māori Language Moment will be held at 12pm today: marking the moment the Māori Language Petition was presented to parliament in 1972.

International Zoom experts have been brought on to support the development of Zui across the motu to support the Te Wā Tuku Reo Māori, the Māori Language moment.

“With an estimated 200,000 people already signed up, and more joining every day, it’s a signal that attitudes towards te reo Māori are changing,” says Mahuta.

“This Government is committed to recognising tikanga, mātauranga and te reo Māori as part of New Zealand’s national identity - it is what makes us unique. Making New Zealand history compulsory in schools, support for Te Pūtake o te Riri and initiatives like this demonstrates this commitment to strengthening as a country.

“At the end of the day though it will require all New Zealanders to work together to be able to maintain the momentum for te reo Māori so that we keep the legacy for future generations of New Zealanders to come."

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Posted on 16-09-2020 14:10 | By morepork

Can somebody tell me what this means please? I’m all in favour of promoting Maoritanga but please don’t just assume we know what "tikanga" and "matauranga" are... Courtesy would require a parenthetical translation when a non-English word is first used in an article, written in English. Otherwise, post it in Maori, so I can ignore it until I have learned Te Reo...