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Tauranga City clambers aboard the bicycle

Rick Hudson tries out the new cycle repair station on the Daisy Hardwick. Photo: John Borren.

It’s another meaningful nod to the future role of the bicycle in Tauranga’s alternative transport and recreation plans.

They’re Tauranga City Council’s new cycle repair stations and cycle stands around the city.

Basically the repair stations are an upright cycle tool box, a metal stave set in concrete with a selection of screwdrivers, hex wrenches, allen wrenches and inner tube wedges to loosen, adjust and tighten bike parts. They are all attached by sturdy chains. There’s also a foot-operated pump with air tube to inflate tyres with either Presta or Schrader valves. And the staple shaped bicycle racks are an end-of-journey facility which are, already, being well patronised.

“Inspirational,” said Terry Hansen who passed by the cycle repair station at the entrance to the Daisy Hardwick track off Maxwells Road recently.  “Good on the Tauranga City Council. A great idea.” 

The repair stations won’t replace the neighbourhood cycle shop. But it’s certainly a convenient DIY back-up. They’re at Moa Park, Macville Park, Gordon Spratt Reserve, Links Avenue Reserve , Waipuna Park and Memorial Park. And the entranceway to the Daisy Hardwick track off Maxwells Road in Bureta.

Seven stops so far and another 10 to come. Also a 100 bike, cycle stand. But unlike Terry Hansen, not every ratepayer thinks the idea is inspirational.

 “Walking at the Daisy Hardwick, my husband and I could not believe that the council is throwing more money down the bottomless pit.” Geraldine Julou’s letter to The Weekend Sun referred to the “state of the art” cycle station. “I wonder how much they cost and how many more are around the city?” she asked.

The Weekend Sun can tell her the repair stations are costing $24,820 and the bike stands have cost $22,500 and are being funded in partnership with the NZTA.

“The council is currently in the process of installing end-of-journey facilities, or bikes stands, and bike maintenance facilities or bicycle repair stations in high use areas, including reserves,” says TCC acting transportation manager, Phil Consedine.

And cyclist Terry Hansen is very impressed. “Because a lot of casual cyclists don’t carry equipment, don’t carry a pump. And when they break down, anyone passing with equipment ends up helping them out and lending them gear. So it’s an asset, good for the city.”

The trails are attracting more and more people, and more and more cycle tourists. The city is becoming a destination for cycling. ”And this facility adds to the whole experience for people out cycling and enjoying the city. Look at the greater picture, it’s providing a service, assisting tourists.”

The Daisy Hardwick repair station is right beside a drinking fountain, so it’s a stopping point, a gathering point. “Makes perfect sense to me. A lot of people start their rides there and will be checking their cycles before setting out,” says Terry. “Good on the council. Innovative and a wonderful recreational facility.”

Basically the repair stations are an upright cycle tool box, a metal stave set in concrete with a selection of screwdrivers, hex wrenches, allen wrenches and inner tube wedges to loosen, adjust and tighten bike parts. They are all attached by sturdy chains. There’s also a foot-operated pump with air tube to inflate tyres with either Presta or Schrader valves. And the staple shaped bicycle racks are an end-of-journey facility which are, already, being well patronised.

“Inspirational,” said Terry Hansen who passed by the cycle repair station at the entrance to the Daisy Hardwick track off Maxwells Road recently.  “Good on the Tauranga City Council. A great idea.” 

The repair stations won’t replace the neighbourhood cycle shop. But it’s certainly a convenient DIY back-up. They’re at Moa Park, Macville Park, Gordon Spratt Reserve, Links Avenue Reserve , Waipuna Park and Memorial Park. And the entranceway to the Daisy Hardwick track off Maxwells Road in Bureta.

Seven stops so far and another 10 to come. Also a 100 bike, cycle stand. But unlike Terry Hansen, not every ratepayer thinks the idea is inspirational.

 “Walking at the Daisy Hardwick, my husband and I could not believe that the council is throwing more money down the bottomless pit.” Geraldine Julou’s letter to The Weekend Sun referred to the “state of the art” cycle station. “I wonder how much they cost and how many more are around the city?” she asked.

The Weekend Sun can tell her the repair stations are costing $24,820 and the bike stands have cost $22,500 and are being funded in partnership with the NZTA.

“The council is currently in the process of installing end-of-journey facilities, or bikes stands, and bike maintenance facilities or bicycle repair stations in high use areas, including reserves,” says TCC acting transportation manager, Phil Consedine.

And cyclist Terry Hansen is very impressed. “Because a lot of casual cyclists don’t carry equipment, don’t carry a pump. And when they break down, anyone passing with equipment ends up helping them out and lending them gear. So it’s an asset, good for the city.”

The trails are attracting more and more people, and more and more cycle tourists. The city is becoming a destination for cycling. ”And this facility adds to the whole experience for people out cycling and enjoying the city. Look at the greater picture, it’s providing a service, assisting tourists.”

The Daisy Hardwick repair station is right beside a drinking fountain, so it’s a stopping point, a gathering point. “Makes perfect sense to me. A lot of people start their rides there and will be checking their cycles before setting out,” says Terry. “Good on the council. Innovative and a wonderful recreational facility.”

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Cost

Posted on 06-05-2019 09:01 | By Corwen

Doing some sums shows the following: Repair stations - 17 x $ 24,820 = $ 421,940 Bike/Cycle Stands - 100 @ $ 22,500 = $ 2,250,000 Total spend $ 2,671,940 that’s Two million, six hundred and seventy one thousand, nine hundred and forty one dollars. Ridiculous! Someone is doing very well out of this expenditure!

Pumps and tools wasted funds

Posted on 03-05-2019 20:17 | By formulafuzz

On the occasions my bicycle tyre went flat it was due to a hole in the tube. Days of pumping would not fix it. As for tools - when was the last time someone needed tools. Never in my lifetime.

Priorities

Posted on 03-05-2019 12:45 | By Told you

Here we go again pampering to the cyclists,what about sorting out the mess on our roads and get Tauranga moving again.