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Disruptions expected due to school staff shortage

File Photo.

School principals are expecting disruptions when most schools go back this week because of a shortage of staff.

It's estimated 650 more teachers are needed this year and that's after 200 have been recruited from overseas.

Principals' Federation president Whetu Cormick says principals will be under extreme pressure preparing for the new school year.

"We are fearful that our young people won't have teachers in front of them, but in saying that school principals across the country will be working incredibly hard to ensure that children do have somebody in front of them, so typically what's happening to cover these vacancies is that senior leaders are having to go back into the classroom to teach."

Whetu says some schools will be forced to have larger class sizes because of the shortage of teachers.

In the longer term, the Education Ministry last year forecast that the teacher shortage would ease for primary schools, but get a lot worse for secondary schools over the next eight years.

It estimated that without further action, the shortfall of secondary teachers would grow from 170 this year to 2210 by 2025, while the shortage of primary teachers would reduce from 650 this year to a surplus of 90 teachers by 2023 but worsen again after that date.

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Strange thing is..........

Posted on 28-01-2019 13:55 | By groutby

.....this seems to happen every year without ever being fixed....by ANY government. I am commenting as an outsider to the true situation, but it does seem to me that there is ever growing ’misinformation’ circling which ’muddies’ the real facts. This article says 650 teachers estimated..(why estimated?..this should be a fairly accurate calculation after all this time I would have thought?. teacher to pupil ratio and whatever else the opposing sides invent)..another commentator from a Union said around 300 this morning...and yet it is common to hear of qualified teachers not being able to get a permanent job...(temporary positions etc..why so many?)....there must be numbers and accurate statistics available surely, but I do not think we are getting them. You will NEVER get a resolution based on such factual variance..perhaps it is quite deliberately done?...continually using ’the kids’ as pawns is not achieving an outcome.